On evaluation design

Finally the outputs. Both the BIM Hub project and the AMORES project have the same two sets of evaluation reports. Given the aims of the project to be both useful, and robust methodologically, I think having the outputs in these two forms is essential.

Typically these two forms are:

  1. A “how to” guide

    The AMORES one is at this link: www.amores-project.eu/news/why-the-amores-teaching-methodology-is-the-secret-ingredient-to-teaching-literature.

    The BIM Hub one is here: bim-hub.lboro.ac.uk/guidance-notes/introduction/

    Both of these summarise the key points of learning from the project, in a form that practitioners can adopt this learning and incorporate it into their own practice.

  2. However, backing up these documents are fuller evaluation reports detailing the data and analysis and showing how these points of learning were arrived at, and providing the evidential basis for making the claims. This isn’t essential for people to read, but these documents do provide the authority for the statements made in the summary documents.

    Finally both projects also include visual materials that contribute to the evidence. In the BIM Hub project, this is recordings of the meetings the students held, showing how their abilities developed over time. For the AMORES project there are dozens of examples of the students’ digital artefacts. In short, when you’re publishing the evaluation you also want to reassure your audience that you haven’t just made the whole thing up.

i.e. The final principle generate artefacts during the project so that at the end you can: show that it is a real project, with real students, doing real stuff.

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About the author

Mark Childs

As Senior Lecturer in Technology Enhanced Learning, Mark’s role is to help deliver the Technology Enhanced Learning Framework across Oxford Brookes and to support OCSLD and its staff with their online presence.

Mark’s career in Higher Education has two complementary strands, as a researcher in TEL since 1997 and as an educational developer in TEL since 2003. He has worked at the University of Wolverhampton, the University of Warwick and Coventry University. Between 2011 and arriving at Brookes in 2015 Mark worked as a “freelance academic” providing educational research, consultancy and training for a range of clients including the Open University, Hewlett Packard, The Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, Ravensbourne College, Worcester University and the Tablet Academy where he is currently its research director.

Mark’s educational development work is informed by, and provides a goal for, his research. The core of these research interests is the use of a wide-range of synchronous communication platforms for education, including social media, videoconferencing, virtual worlds and games-based learning. His most recent work is in the area of online collaboration for design using social media and videoconferencing, where he has evaluated the learner experience of students in distributed teams in projects led by Loughborough University and by CARNet in Zagreb, Croatia. In parallel to this he has a wide-ranging interest in many other fields of research; for example, his most recent publication is a DVD with the OU on Ethiopia’s progress towards reducing child and maternal mortality.

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